28+ Management Plan Examples – PDF, Word


Imagine how a business would operate in the absence of a proper management plan. Can it still perform effectively? Would it still garner positive outcomes in every endeavor carried out by its entire team? If you’re having difficulty picturing this out, then try visualizing a workplace without a manager present to supervise employees.

Chaotic, disorderly, and vulnerable to risks and pitfalls are just the simplest ways to describe what a business would be like without a management plan in place.

Simple Asset Management Plan Template

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Sample Management Plan Example

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Project Management Plan

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Procurement Management Plan

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Simple Operations Management Plan

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Transport Management Plan Template

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A management plan is a formal, approved business document that is created to define how certain parts of the business’ decisions and strategies many be executed, monitored, and controlled effectively. But establishing this type of plan doesn’t happen overnight, as it involves an intense process that must be carried out professionally. You may also see project plan examples.

Brand Management Plan Example

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Classroom Management Plan Template

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Sample Incident Management Plan

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Asset Management Plan Template

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Simple Debt Management Plan

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Water Demand Management Plan Example

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Build Asset Management Plan Example

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Four Basic Types of Planning

Following a proper business planning structure can be beneficial in a number of ways. This structure can help an organization formulate strategic plans as a whole — with the involvement of every prime sector in the company, including the general management and its hourly employees. While it might seem pretty extensive, involving everyone in the process has proven to generate positive results over the years.

1. Financial Planning

Money is a huge factor in business, especially in terms of budget setting and cost estimation. With the infinite number of ways to create a financial plan for your business, what methods would garner the best possible results?

When it comes to financial planning, you must consider the following factors:

  • The plan must be agreed upon by every member of the organization.
  • The plan must be communicated clearly for everyone to grasp.
  • The plan must be practical.
  • The plan must be goal-oriented and forward-thinking.
  • The plan must be formally reviewed and monitored on an ongoing basis.

2. Strategic Planning

Apart from having a financial plan in place, the organization must also possess a strategic vision that may significantly impact the decision-making process. It must possess a believable and predictable sales line for it to carry out successfully. As a corporate entity, you must also conduct a SWOT analysis to fully define the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats that may affect the business.

Additionally, you must also have a clear understanding of competitor behavior, along with your specified marketplace and overall economy.

3. Contingency Planning

In any situation, having a “Plan B” can guide you through unprecedented circumstances that may negatively impact business operations at the most critical times. For this reason, having a sturdy contingency plan is vital to the growth and success of the business.

But creating a backup plan isn’t exactly the easiest thing to do, as this requires you to envision possible scenarios that may occur beyond your control. A good contingency plan typically reflects a researched and evaluated opportunity that the organization may deal with in the near future. If the event of an unforeseen disaster, the business can quickly activate these strategies in order to fill the void. You may also see action plan examples.

4. Succession Planning

What if a supervisor, manager, or even a business executive, who has worked for the company for several years now, decided to leave the company so suddenly? Are you prepared for such transition? How will the organization replace a major player in your team in such short notice? While losing a valuable member of your department can be a huge hurdle to get pass, you still need to make sure the company continues to grow in spite of this loss.

But keep in mind that succession planning goes beyond just naming a successor to fill in a major job position. A defined succession plan opens doors for managers and succession candidates, as it serves as an opportunity for competent employees to move into a new position and pursue better things.

Considering how this may involve a gradual process that would require a good amount of time to carry out, succession candidates must be groomed, trained, and developed to fill in the shoes of a previous employee, so when the opportunity arises, the company is fully prepared for this shift. This way, the organization can continue on with their operations without wasting any time or resources. You may also see annual plan examples and samples.

Climate Risk Management Plan Example

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Coastal Management Plan Example

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Management Plans: Strategic, Tactical, & Operational Plans

The prosperity of a business largely depends upon the construction and execution of the management plans. Without such, it would be impossible for the organization to operate smoothly and effectively enough for the business to grow. In the process of developing a management plan, managers must create a set of procedures, rules, and guidelines for accomplishing a defined objective or business goal.

Below, let us discuss the three standards types of plans in management as well as how they function within an organizational framework:

1. Strategic Management Plan

From the name itself, it’s clear that this type of management plan concerns the general overview of the entire business, along with its vision, objectives, and value. This acts as the primary basis for the decision-making process with a scope of two to ten years. A strategic plan may also influence company culture within the organization, and how it communicates with its clients, customers, and the media.

The following components are crucial to the development of a strategic management plan:

  • Vision – Where do you see yourself five years from now? Is the company thriving? Is it leaving an impact to the world? These are some of the questions you must ponder on when describing the vision of your company. While there’s nothing wrong with possessing idealistic views on this, you also need to keep it real with a few SMART goals.
  • Mission – The mission statement of your plan is a bit more practical when it comes to the company’s aims and ambitions. For instance, a retail clothing company might want to “bring high fashion to the streets”, while a non-profit organization might want to “offer cheap education to the less fortunate.”
  • Values – The values of a company is an important quality that can greatly influence the behavior and outlook of its members. This serves as a guide for hiring managers when choosing job applicants who are not only competent for the role, but possess the characteristics that reflect the company’s values as well. You may also like implementation plan examples & samples.

As you can see, there are no standard rules as to how a strategic management plan must be written. This is a type of document that dictates the future of a company based on what has been visualized, examined, and analyzed by its governing body.

Destination Management Plan Example

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Developing a Lake Management Plan Example

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2. Tactical Management Plan

Once a strategic management plan has been established, the organization must then come up with a list of tactics to achieve these objectives. This is created to break down broader missions into smaller, doable chunks for each member of the workforce to tackle. This allows employees to work on tasks a lot more carefully and distinctly in order to acquire successful results. You may also check out event plan examples & samples.

There a few key components that need to be applied in a tactical plan, these are as follows:

  • Strict deadlines – When generating a management plan, always remember to specify your life goals and set fixed deadlines as to when these aims must be obtained. Establishing a time frame to complete these tasks will spur immediate action among employees, prompting everyone to work towards the end goal.
  • Budgets – Given how money plays a major part in running a business, it’s important to create a tactical plan that specifies budgetary requirements needed to attain the company’s goals. This involves a thorough process of procuring funds and channelizing it strategically. Apart from your personnel, you must also cover marketing, manufacturing, sourcing, and other divisions essential to your business operations. These funds must be utilized wisely on labor, raw materials, capital goods, and information systems as well. You might be interested in risk plan examples & samples.
  • Resources – Apart from your budget, there are other company resources that must be attended to as well. This includes human resources, financial resources, physical resources, emotional resources, and the like.

3. Operational Management Plan

An operational management plan focuses on day-to-day tasks that must be completed within a realistic time frame. It functions as a road map to guide managers and employees in achieving short-term objectives efficiently. This revolves around initiating and implementing actions involved in a comprehensive, long-term plan. You may also see advertising plan examples & samples.

  • Single-use plans – A single-use operational plan is produced ideally for events or activities with a one-time occurrence. Situations that employ this type of plan include marketing campaigns, recruitment drives, and sales programs.
  • Ongoing plans – Ongoing plans are usually repeated and changed whenever necessary. These plans come in different types, specifically in the form of a policy, rule, or procedure, and are executed depending on the situation at hand. You may also like job plan examples & samples.

Since running a successful business requires equal attention to not just the general objectives that make up the company, but to how these objectives are met on a day-to-day basis as well, thus the need for a detailed operational plan.

Drinking Water Management Plan Example

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Environmental and Social Management Plan Example

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The Ultimate Guide to Writing a Management Plan

Now that we have examined why management plans are a major component of a business plan, it’s now time to get into the writing process.

To start off, what are the main components of a management plan?

A short summary of your plan’s content would point towards the outline of the project’s goals and objectives, the actions required to achieve these aims, a description of the roles and responsibilities of each team member — along with the time commitment needed to accomplish a given task, the procedures set for recruiting participants, the process of acquiring and maintaining equipment, a timeline for carrying out each stage of the project, a guide for handling possible modifications, and a consideration of the project’s impact on the organization’s internal and external resources.

When writing a management plan, you need to organize the document into specific sections detailing different parts of the business.

Tasks and Responsibilities of Personnel

Describing the function of workforce personnel and participants is critical to understanding how the project will be executed. This is an important component of a management plan that defines the time commitments required to carry out tasks, such as on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis, or even just for occasional meetings.

Since operations are bound to change along the way, the potential evolution of these roles must be indicated in the project’s suggested work schedule. If possible (and when necessary), names of the designated personnel could also be specified in the general plan.

Most corporate entities utilize an organizational chart to keep track of these roles. Here, the information displayed can streamline complex descriptions of personnel, along with their distinct responsibilities, in the overall structure of the plan. Charting creates a visual representation of individual positions and tasks for the management to trace the system of governance and decision-making, in the event of a fallout. You may also see sales plan examples.

1. The Internal Management Team

Selecting a competent group of skilled workers for your team will greatly contribute to the success of your business.

But because a corporate organization typically consists of various areas relevant to the business, it’s important to identify these central management categories in your plan, as well as the individuals responsible for each category, and the skills that they possess. You may also like company plan examples & samples.

The standard areas of a business include the fields of accounting, sales and marketing, human resources, administration, and production, just to name a few. Some companies may even require a research and development department for data collection and analysis.

Bear in mind that the person in charge for each area may fill more than just one role, depending on the individual’s capacity and work ethics. A list of these individuals, along with their respective functions, will serve as the management team outline for your plan. This outline must also have the complete resumes of each member attached, and an explanation of how these skills may contribute to business operations. You may also check out wedding plan examples & samples.

2. External Management Resources

Though external resources are often disregarded in simple business plans, using these resources correctly can generate successful results for the organization.

Think of these external management resources as a support system for your internal management team. Apart from securing credibility, they also provide an extra pool of expertise to the work process. The two main sources for this include the professional services and the advisory board.

In the professional services portion of your management plan, you must prepare a list of the professional advisors that will play a part in your business, such as bankers, accountants, lawyers, business consultants, and IT consultants. These individuals are responsible for providing you a chain of advice and support outside your internal team, which may be used in determining management decisions. You may also see personal plan examples & samples.

The advisory board, on the other hand, function similarly as your professional advisors. Think of it as a management think tank that is capable of offering you with additional advice on how you could run your business profitably. Given how board members possess the ability to provide you with expertise that your internal team lacks, you must choose these individuals carefully. You may also like work plan examples & samples.

You obviously want to select people who are genuinely interested in seeing your business prosper, while also bearing a good amount of experience and expertise in the said field. Most companies hire former executives and managers for the job, but successful entrepreneurs and vendors can also supply reliable insights for effective management.

Health and Safety Management Plan Example

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Invasive Species Management Plan Example

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3. Audience Participation

At some point in your management plan, you may need the participation of a specific group of individuals. This is commonly found in the data management plan of your business document, but is highly possible to appear in project management as well. For example, in the process of data collection, you need to indicate a detailed procedure as to how participants may be selected, and how the data provided shall be stored and evaluated later on. You may also check out quality plan examples & samples.

The management plan must outline the whole process of choosing these participants, ensuring retention, and the method of assessing the acquired data. The outcome garnered from this process may be used to improve particular areas of the business to ensure quality service and production.

4. Collaborations

If you wish to collaborate with other departments or businesses, then this must described clearly in your management plan. The reason for such collaboration must be expounded explicitly in the document to give readers, comprising of business executives, an inside look as to how this may benefit the company one way or another. You might be interested in evaluation plan examples & samples.

Take note that communication is a significant part of any type of collaboration. So before implementing anything on your plan, ensure that the principal means of communication — whether this consists of weekly meeting, video conferences, and phone calls — have already been taken into account.

5. Project Timeline

Creating a timeline for your project isn’t as simple as it seems. A project timeline is more than just a task checklist with plotted deadlines on one side, as most managers use actual schedule sheets and Gantt charts to visualize the different stages involved in the plan. Preparing a timeline will provide you with a sense of knowing, considering how the proposed length of each stage is clearly indicated on the chart.

At each stage, you can further portray transitional objectives that must be accomplished throughout the whole process, how frequent committees are bound to meet, when assessments are required to take place, and when results may be anticipated.

Having a timeline ready may also answer possible questions that members of each team may bring up, and clarify any mix-ups that may not have been communicated clearly by managing officers.

Physiotherapy Management Plan Example

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Project Management Plan Example

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The Fundamental Steps in Creating a Management Plan

When running a business, you need to have a clear idea of your current position in the market, where you’re headed, and how you intend to get there. But it’s not like you could embark on a magic carpet ride to reach your dreams and aspirations in a simple blink of an eye, which is why building a realistic and achievable plan is key towards business success. Through a strong management plan, you can easily define the desired outcomes to your actions, as well as the strategy needed to acquire it. You may also see research plan examples & samples.

Bringing these plans into motion will help the company move forward, while also leaving you with a good amount of time, energy, and capital to focus on other aspects of your business.

1. Evaluate the situation. 

For you to determine which path to take, you must first understand the position you are in at this very moment.

Start by gathering data regarding your company’s current situation, such as sales figures and consumer feedback. Like for example, how many companies conduct product surveys to gain insights on customer demands and their purchasing behavior. Through various data collection methods, you can easily identify the organization’s strengths and weaknesses, covering the internal voices of staff members along with the external voices of clients and customers. you may also like development plan examples & samples.

2. Set your priorities. 

What do you want to achieve? How will these objectives benefit a certain sector, or perhaps even your company as a whole?

It’s important to determine the kind of values and outcomes you wish to attain. Once these have been established, you must then state these clearly in your management plan. Crafting a vision statement that properly articulates the different ideas and values needed to keep your business on track will help you create a plan that is focused and committed to a goal. You may also check out free business plan examples.

To do so, you must work closely with members of your management team to clarify the vision you have in mind. Ensure that these guiding principles are agreed-upon by the entire workforce to prevent probable conflicts that may arise.

3. Define your goals.

As soon as your priorities have been set, you can then create measurable goals for the organization. Say for example, if your retail company is driven towards uplifting environmental awareness, you can set goals that practice the “no-plastic” policy when dealing with customer transactions. Here, the company must come up with different strategies and campaigns that pay full importance to the end goal.

When it comes to goal-setting, you must be as clear and specific as possible to avoid confusion. Once interpreted differently, the actions executed to resolve complications and answer to the needs of stakeholders might not be favorable towards the goals shared by other members of the organization. Also remember to track your progress using numbers to measure success, and chart timelines to achieve these objectives in a timely basis. You might be interested in transition plan examples & samples.

4. Develop accountability systems.

Assigning managers and staff members to be in charge of a domain will help you evaluate the progress made as you strive towards reaching your business goals. This is why most companies break down their entire workforce into different branches in order to form a hierarchy which shows who is ultimately responsible for certain outcomes. Members of each division usually report to a higher governing body (also known as the leader of the team), who shall be held accountable for any shortcomings that might affect the chain of operations. You may also see weekly plan examples & samples.

In case of an emergency, it’s always good to have a backup plan ready so you could easily shift gears and devote additional resources to these special tasks.

5. Examine and review. 

Finally, developing the necessary protocols to assess your progress can be valuable in a lot of ways. You need to bring in as many voices to take part in the evaluation process in order to generate reliable data. It’s also essential to encourage honesty and objectivity among participants. The key to a good assessment is to be open-minded to criticisms and other loopholes that may have been overlooked during the beginning of this procedure. You may also like communication plan examples & samples.

You can do so by assessing how well you are working towards your goal, but also being open to reassessing these goals to see whether they are relevant to your long-term vision.

Keep in mind that running in a fast-paced industry poses more room for inevitable changes, so there’s always a possibility that these changes may affect the value and relevance of your present goals.

Quality Management Plan Example

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Risk Management Plan Example

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River Basin Management Plan Example

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Safety and Security Management Plan Example

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State Emergency Management Plan Example

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Strategic Management Plan Example

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Traffic Management Plan Example

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A management plan is one of the most important sections of any business plan. Without a well-defined management plan in place, it would be impossible for a business to construct goal-oriented strategies that are both forward-looking and practical to its objectives. That being said, creating a management plan that can shape the actions delivered by each division of the organization is extremely essential. You may also see strategic plan examples & samples.

This will serve as a guide for implementing smart, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound goals that focus on the long-term vision of the given company.

So before you proceed to writing your management plan, make sure you possess enough knowledge to know what it is, what it’s for, and how it may contribute to your company’s success. With the help of these steps, you can create the perfect management plan without a hitch!

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