Positive Punishment – Examples, PDF


Conditioning is one of the best ways to learn a specific behavior or attitude. This technique can also be used to modify or prevent the occurrence of a specific behavior or attitude. One of the best ways to prevent an undesired behavior from happening is through positive punishment.

1. Positive Reinforcement vs Positive Punishment

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2. Punishment and Rate of Positive Reinforcement

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3. Operant Conditioning Positive Reinforcement

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4. Positive Reinforcement Practice

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5. Positive Reinforcement Training

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6. Analysis of Positive Reinforcement Punishment

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7. Effects of Positive Reinforcement

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What Is a Positive Punishment

Positive punishment is one of the vectors of operant conditioning, wherein the conditioner will add a negative stimulus to the entity to prevent it from doing a specific behavior or attitude as the effect of conditioning. This vector is a juxtaposition of positive reinforcement, as it adds something unpleasant to the organism that is being conditioned.

How to Use Positive Punishment for Conditioning

Conditioning is a very long process that will take a lot of input from the person doing said conditioning. If you need a template for positive punishment or examples to use as reference, you may use articles named analysis of positive reinforcement punishment, positive reinforcement practice, and positive reinforcement training on the links above.

Step 1: Research About Positive Punishment

Begin by either researching or refreshing one’s knowledge of positive punishment. This will provide you with knowledge and context of how to pace positive punishment.

Step 2: Choose a Living Thing to Condition

Select the living thing you want to condition a specific behavior or attitude to. Note that positive punishment has varying effects based on the species and sub-species of the living thing.

Step 3: Check or Figure Out their Unwanted Stimulus

Each thing has specific wants and preferences that can be very subjective or shared across the species. For the positive punishment to work, you must check and figure out the stimulus that will be considered a positive punishment.

Step 4: Create a Conditioning Timeline

The conditioning must be properly paced along a timeframe. Create a timeline that will provide a structure for the whole conditioning process as this will deal with the rate of positive punishment.

Step 5: Apply Consistent Positive Punishment Activities and Exercise

After you have finished doing all the steps above, you will need to apply the conditioning. Do note that positive punishment will only work if it is consistently enforced. This means that there will be no leeways and leniency during the conditioning.

FAQs

Positive punishment vs negative punishment; what is the difference between positive punishment and positive punishment?

These two types of conditioning tactics deal with the controlled adding or taking away something the conditioned entity finds unpleasant or dislikes. Positive punishment is a conditioning tactic, which refers to the adding of stimuli the entity does not like or finds unpleasant to condition a specific behavior or response. Negative punishment is a conditioning tactic, which refers to the taking away of stimuli the entity doesn’t like or finds unpleasant to condition a specific behavior or response. The main difference between these two types of punishment is the way the conditioner tries to prevent or encourage the stimuli.

What are classic examples of positive punishment?

There are many classic examples of positive punishment one can find in parenting and disciplining techniques found around the world. A classic example of positive punishment is in the parent’s act of adding either a physical punishment like a slap on the wrist or extra chores and workload whenever a child misbehaves. Another classic example of positive punishment is the implementation of extra rules, whenever something bad occurs. These examples succinctly show the addition of punishment to abate a specific action or behavior.

Is positive punishment useful in the training of dogs?

Dog trainers often use positive reinforcement and punishment in the training of their dogs, as these animals are more receptive to this conditioning style. But there is a small caveat as dogs can interpret the punishment and produce an action such as aggressive tendencies due to this style. Not only that but positive punishment can cause the dog to associate with the conditioner as a threat. This means that people need to properly pace positive punishment with positive reinforcement to help ease the tension.

Positive punishment is a conditioning technique or style that focuses on adding a specific unwanted and unwelcome stimulus to a specific person. This will try to outright minimize or prevent the unwanted behavior from occurring through association and conditioning.

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