10 Formal Report Examples & Samples

10 Formal Report Examples & Samples


Reports give information in a capsulized form. Reports basically give a discussion on a specific topic or subject which is typically presented to a particular audience for a certain purpose. There are two basic ways of delivering reports: written report and oral. Each of which is effective in disseminating information to the audience.

A report does not only present facts on specific topics, but also evidence and accounts (both written and oral) which typically supports such report. Different report provide different information–one of such reports will be discussed in this source.

Formal Laboratory Report Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 319 KB

Download

Formal Business Report

formal business report5
Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 104 KB

Download

Formal Investigation Report

Details
File Format
  • DOC

Size: 6 KB

Download

Formal Audit and Review Report Sample

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 180 KB

Download

Formal Incident Report

Details
File Format
  • DOC

Size: 17 KB

Download

What Is a Formal Report?

In business, a formal report is considered as an important report which includes a detailed presentation of different pieces of information necessary for business operations  and decision-making process. A formal report typically carries information obtained from research, formal analysis, and observations conducted during a specific period of time.

Formal reports can either be informational or analytical, which discusses a certain problem in depth, and the process of coming up with a solution to address such problem.

How to Write a Formal Report

Rules and terms of writing a formal report may differ from one organization to another. Still, research reports are written to communicate with a certain audience.

In order to write a formal report, one must first be familiar of the rules and terms on writing a formal report. Of course, one needs to observe the correctness and accuracy of the information being provided, while at the same time providing the necessary evidence to prove the collection of such information.

Another thing the writer needs to consider  are the readers—whether or not they would be able to understand the information presented. Because a report is a condensed form of the whole project report, the writer needs to carefully think as to what information to include, and whether or not such information is significant enough to be included in the report.

Formal Analytical Report Sample

Details
File Format
  • DOC

Size: 14 KB

Download

Formal Recommendation Report

Details
File Format
  • DOC

Size: 94 KB

Download

Formal Accident Sample Report

formal accident sample report1
Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 19 KB

Download

Formal Progress Report

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 73 KB

Download

Short Formal Report Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 102 KB

Download

Components of a Formal Report

Contents or elements found in a formal report may vary depending on the standard format set by each company or organization. Such components are the divisions which make a formal report easy to comprehend. Here are the basic components typically found in a formal report.

  • Cover page.
  • Letter of transmittal. This section contains a brief description of the report or the project presented on the report, which typically ends with an assignment or instruction for its readers.
  • Title page. This section includes the name of the report (or the topic of the report), name of the authors (with the necessary descriptions), name of recipients (e.g. panels, judges, etc.) including titles (or designations) and name of organization where they belong.
  • Table of contents. Contains section headings and page numbers where each section begins.
  • List of tables and figures. Contains a list of figure and table names, including pages where each figure and table are found.
  • Abstract or executive summary. Summarizes what the whole report is all about, and the details of the subject being tackled in the report.
  • Introduction, body, and conclusion. These sections discusses the structure of report in full detail.
  • Appendices. Supporting details and information not found on the preceding pages.
  • References. Works cited, written in a specific format.