19+ Jargon Examples – PDF

Have you ever watched an episode of House or Grey’s Anatomy with a huge question mark hovering above your head? Despite how interesting these television shows can be, you have to admit, you’re probably clueless about half the things they talk about in the show. You may also see gerund phrase examples.

That’s because these industry-specific terms are foreign to our own ears, and only those who specialize in a given field tend to understand and use these terms so naturally as part of their profession. Jargon, as we call it, is a specialized language used in everyday speech and literature. For us to understand about how these words function in communication, let’s take a deeper look into the whats and whys of jargon. You may also see allusion examples for kids.

Business Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 34 KB

Download

Legal Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 318 KB

Download

Cinematographical and Film Production Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 31 KB

Download

What Is Jargon?

Jargon refers to a specialized set of literary terms and language that is used to convey a hidden meaning accepted and understood by those who are part of a particular group, profession, or trade. The word jargon is derived from the Latin term gaggire, which means “to chatter.” Chatter is considered to be a language that a listener does not understand. Hence, the expression “the chatter of birds.” This term was adopted into French and then Middle English, in which the verb jargounen, carried the same meaning as its Latin equivalent. Simply put, the definition of jargon comes from a sense of the listener not being able to understand the meaning behind a noise. You may also see onomatopoeia examples in literature.

Jargon examples are also used in many forms of literary and non-literary pieces of writing. It is especially common to find various jargon examples in an industry, such as in medicine, business, computer science, or an art or sport. You may also see Appositive Examples.

For example, there are many terms that lawyers and judges use frequently in the legal profession, most of which are too complex for their own clients (and even the jury) to understand. These words are either obscure terms or carry a rather different definition compared to the regular usage of the word. Thus, we often find ourselves searching for its simplified meaning in a dictionary or Google search. You may also see study plan templates.

Some writers use jargon to appeal to a certain class of readers, or to place a hidden meaning to their writing that only members of a specific group would understand. This provides a more efficient type of communication between members of a particular group, though there are times when these terms are used to exclude others who are not part of the group, or to establish one’s belonging to the group. Using jargon is a method of characterization as well. When characters in a written piece use jargon, it tells us something about the character’s interests and profession. You may also see pronoun antecedent examples.

However, some jargon examples that are used excessively in a group can become more widely understood and accepted by the general public. These terms are adopted into common usage, allowing others who are not part of a trade to use and understand them with ease. Some examples include technological terms like “byte” or “RAM,” or natural phrases such as “all hands on deck” and “anchors aweigh.” You may also see award acceptance speech.

The Difference between Jargon, Slang, and Colloquialism

It’s not unusual for people to mistaken jargon for slang or colloquialism, especially when they all refer to a specified language only used by individuals of a certain group. Though we often take it in the same sense, the difference is always there. You may also see noun clause examples.

Colloquialism are terms and phrases that are often seen as idiomatic and informal. These are typically bounded by a geographical region, like how different states refer to a carbonated drink as “soda,” “pop,” “soft drink,” or “Coke.” Although certain objects or events may be recognized by a region-specific name, they usually refer to the same thing. But if there’s one thing that should be remembered, it’s that colloquialisms are not bounded by age or class. You may also see relative clause examples.

Slang, on the other hand, is an informal category of language that is generally used in social groups such as teenagers. It consists of words or phrases with literal meanings that are different than its actual definition. This makes it hard for people outside of the given community or circle to grasp. Slang is commonly used in spoken language than written, and is typically bounded by geography, age, and class. Some common examples of slang terms that have emerged in the mid-2010s include “bae” (before anything else, or short for “baby”), “on fleek” (something that looks perfect, such as in the expression “eyebrows on fleek), and “bye, felicia” (bidding goodbye to something or someone you don’t like). You may also see meeting email samples.

Unlike slang and colloquialism, jargon is not limited by the region, class, or age of which the speaker or writer is a part of rather, by the choices a person makes to participate in a particular art form, join a sport, or take on a given career. It can also be understood by anyone who is broadly associated with a subject, occupation, or business. Many of these words and phrases are made into abbreviations for convenience as well. You may also see business plan executive summary examples.

Knowing the difference between these communication devices will help us understand their roles in speech and writing. This ensures that they are applied correctly for a better and more enriching experience. You may also see Dependent Clause Examples.

Jargon in Technical Writing Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 251 KB

Download

Political Jargon Worksheet Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 1 MB

Download

Scientific and Technical Writing Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 2 MB

Download

Scientific Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 269 KB

Download

Jargon in Communication: Good or Bad?

Jargon is a strange creature that not everyone seems to be a fond of, but are ashamed to admit to have used it more than once in a piece of writing. While it’s easy to see why jargon can be the worst form of communication, it can also be the best. You may also see subordinate clause examples.

Experts believe that although the use of jargon can make you seem smart and put-together, they strongly advise against it, especially when dealing with people who are not a part of a specific group. Jargon generally consists of unfamiliar terms, abstract words, nonexistent words, and acronyms and abbreviations that might not be familiar to those who are not part of a group or profession. It’s not all the time that an author is able to expound the meaning of an industry-specific term in such a way that readers would fully understand. You may also see adjective clause examples.

After all, you can’t expect a lawyer to explain every single jargon he or she uses in the courtroom for listeners to grasp; otherwise, they could spend several hours lecturing an audience as opposed to focusing on the actual case.

As much as possible, jargon should also be avoided when writing business-related documents, like business plans and project proposals, and creating advertising materials, such as marketing brochures and flyer designs. Some clients and customers might miss the point of what you’re trying to convey due to how they interpret it. Keep in mind that not everyone will take the time to research on the actual meaning of a word or phrase, and would rather interpret it based on the context given. The use of jargon can sometimes lead to confusion or misunderstanding, depending on how it is used in a statement or how it is understood by the receiver. You may also see Noun Clause Examples.

Unless your purpose is to educate an audience, you might want to steer clear of this technical language.

Soccer Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 516 KB

Download

Technical Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 40 KB

Download

Understanding Medical Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 1 MB

Download

The Two Types of Jargon-Users

Jargon-users are an interesting breed. You’re probably guilty of using jargon when constructing an essay or report just to impress your professor or manager with your exceptional use of words, or perhaps to increase your word count to meet the necessary requirements. Though it’s usually a matter of taste in the kind of vocabulary and sentence structures they use, we can’t deny the fact that some people use jargon to either sound more knowledgeable in a craft, or to make it seem like they’re really a part of something great. You may also see professional emails.

Type 1

The first type of jargonitis (or the excessive use of jargon) are those that use jargon to seem like a proper professional who is serious about their business. They talk in a way that is authoritative, demanding respect from the people around them. This person can converse with a random stranger at the bar, change the natural way they talk by using jargon, and make it seem as if they know exactly what they’re talking about. You may also see Reference Essay Examples.

Some of these people might even think highly about themselves, more important and worthy of a promotion than the rest of their colleagues. Others tend to be bolder and more imaginative compared to most, often creating new buzzwords and phrases to set themselves apart. Though this may seem like a harsh way to describe this category of individuals, there’s not much we can do to help them change their ways. They worry more about using the conventions of language for self-advancement than using it to communicate clearly with an audience. You may also want to know more about adjective clause examples.

Type 2

Fortunately, people with the second type of jargonitis aren’t as severe as type 1. These are the people who choose to alter their natural fluency in order to adapt to the language of a jargon-user. Oftentimes, the pressure of being able to fit in is what triggers this kind of behavior. Being excluded from a group can take a toll on their self-esteem, forcing them to change a part of themselves just to be acknowledged by avid jargon-users, even when they aren’t completely comfortable with it.

Some self-control and a little encouragement from others will certainly restrain you from becoming a type 2 jargonitis. Many teachers and mentors continue to guide their students with the proper use of jargon to prevent any of the two cases mentioned. Keep in mind that it’s only acceptable to use jargon for efficient communication. Otherwise, you might as well avoid the use of jargon completely. You may also see formal writings.

Architectural Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 11 KB

Download

Basketball Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 81 KB

Download

Business Jargon Fixes Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 269 KB

Download

Education Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 207 KB

Download

The Different Forms of Jargon

A wide variety of jargon exists in the world of communication, where each term is made specific to a given field or study. To understand more about this concept, refer to the following examples: You may also see Maid of Honor Speech Examples.

1. Business Jargon

Most of the words and phrases that are classified as business jargon are simple and intelligible. Also known as corporate jargon or business-speak, this is often used by members of corporations and bureaucracies. You may also see free essay examples.

  • Shovel ready – be prepared or ready for something
  • The 9-to-5 – the standard workday of an average employee
  • Chief cook and bottle-washer – a person with several responsibilities
  • Bang for the buck – to get the most out of your money
  • Buzzworthy – something worth talking about

2. Medical Jargon

Medical jargon can be extremely hard to understand, especially for people who are not part of the profession. For instance, the word script could mean one thing in the entertainment industry, but another in the field of medicine (medical jargon for “prescription”). It is usually composed of abstract terms which are often difficult to read and pronounce, and abbreviations or acronyms of lengthy words and phrases. Some common examples include:

  • Whipple procedure – a pancreatotomy, where the distal stomach, gallbladder, and duodenum are also taken out during surgery. You may also see student essay examples.
  • ACLS – a medical shorthand for advanced cardiac life support
  • Angina pectoris – refers to a severe acute attack of cardiac pain
  • NPO – or “nil per os,” which means a patient should not take anything through the mouth
  • Bowel disimpaction – which refers to the manual removal of fecal matters from a patient’s rectum

3. Police Jargon

Police jargon generally consists of secret codes that only those from the inside could decipher. These are also used for quick and effective communication during emergency response scenarios. You may also see short essay examples.

  • Code Eight – a term which indicates than an officer requires immediate help
  • DUI – an acronym for driving under the influence
  • 10-4 – a radio police jargon for “Okay” or “I understand”
  • IED – an acronym for an improvised explosive device
  • Assumed room temperature – the subject has died

4. Military Jargon

Military jargon is fairly similar to police jargon, except that they involve military-specific actions that are often used in battle. The military has a long list of unique and specific items and concepts that civilians aren’t exposed to. This is done to ensure the safety and security of these troops in risky scenarios or in foreign lands. While some are self-explanatory, others can be completely cryptic. You may also see concept essay examples.

  • Digies – a digital camouflage typically worn by soldiers and marines
  • Cannibalize – the act of taking workable parts of one item to use them in another
  • Hawk – a term referring to the cold weather
  • Moonbeam – a marine term for flashlight
  • PCS – acronym for permanent change of station

5. Political Jargon

These are the words and phrases commonly used by politicians, media personalities, lobbyists, and other people who discuss political issues in a quicker, coded manner. However, some political jargon examples may vary depending on the region’s government structure and function. For example, a “red state” refers to a state that primarily favors Republicans or conservatives, while “blue state” refers to a state that votes for Democrats or liberals. These specialized terms cater to the political system practiced in the United States.You may also see academic essay examples.

  • Left-Wing – a term used to define a politician or citizen who has a more liberal and progressive viewpoint compared to the average person
  • Right-Wing – a term used to classify a politician or citizen who has a more conservative viewpoint than that of an average person
  • Lame duck – refers to a politician who is considered ineffective either because he or she was elected out of office or had just recently announced retirement
  • Tree hugger – an environmentalist
  • Flip flopper – a politician or candidate who tends to change his or her mind in regards to an important issue over time

6. Computer Jargon

Many computer jargon examples are widely understood thanks to the abundant use of technology. Though not many adults are familiar with these words and phrases, you’re bound to come across several of these terms as you browse through your mobile devices and personal computers.You may also see high school essay examples.

  • Bug – an unwanted component of a program or piece of hardware that causes it to malfunction
  • Cache – a small, fast memory containing recently accessed data which is designed to speed up access to the same data
  • Jumper – refers to a removable wire or cable whose presence or absence is used to identify a particular aspect of hardware configuration
  • Bit – a unit of information obtained by asking yes-or-no questions which can also take on one of two values, such as as false (0) or true (1)
  • Cookie – a cracker term that defines the password list on a multi-user computer

7. Sports Jargon

For any non-sports enthusiasts out there, this may be a useful guide to understanding the basic lingo of your best friend, sibling, or significant other. While some of these words and phrases are good and sensible, others just seem like made-up terms created by some random sports analyst.You may also see persuasive essay examples.

  • Beanball – a playful term used to describe a baseball pitcher who has just committed an assault
  • Hat trick – when a sports player scores three goals in a single game
  • Utility player – an athlete who’s good at a lot of things but great in none
  • Unsung hero – the least recognized player in the team who happens to be the most effective one
  • A real coach’s player – similar to a teacher’s pet, this refers to a player who does what he’s told with no questions asked

8. Cinematic Jargon

If jargon exists in the world of sports, you can only imagine the long list of jargon used in the entertainment industry as well. A film set can be a confusing place for an outsider to be in, especially with the widespread use of insider acronyms and strange vocabulary. Cinematic jargon are terms that directors, screenplay writers, film critics, and actors commonly use on-set.You may also see concept essay examples.

  • Blocking – the process of running through a scene prior to the actual filming to assess where actors will move and where camera and lighting equipment should be placed
  • Boom – the fuzzy microphone attached to the end of a long pole that is used to pick up dialogue in the scene
  • Gate – if an assistant director shouts “Check the gate!” the camera crew must review the camera and film for any impurities or blockages that were caught
  • Rhubarb – also known as “walla,” this refers to the background conversation made by the extras in a scene
  • That’s a wrap or “wrap” – this marks the end of a shoot

Medical Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 208 KB

Download

Police Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 17 KB

Download

Professional Business Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 3 MB

Download

Research Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 581 KB

Download

Tech Jargon Example

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 2 MB

Download

Significance of Jargon in Literature

There are many literary authors who choose to use jargon in their works to show that a character belongs to a profession that he or she is supposed to have. Like for instance, it’s hard to believe that Meredith Grey is part of a medical team if the screenwriter decided she was better off using everyday terms when conversing with patients and colleagues, or that Olivia Benson is a detective of the SVU if she failed to describe an act of crime in such a way that professionals in her line of work would. You may also see Tangential Speech Examples.

Some technical terms are also used to educate an audience about a particular subject matter, such as the example provided below:

“Certain medications can cause or worsen nasal symptoms (especially congestion). These include the following: birth control pills, some drugs for high blood pressure (e.g., alpha blockers and beta blockers), antidepressants, medications for erectile dysfunction, and some medications for prostatic enlargement. If rhinitis symptoms are bothersome and one of these medications is used, ask the prescriber if the medication could be aggravating the condition.”

Patient Education: Nonallergic Rhinitis by Robert H. Fletcher and Phillip L. Lieberman

The given passage is filled with medical jargon that only those in the medical community could fully comprehend. If anything, jargon can help lend an air of credibility in writing, allowing readers to suspend their disbelief in a given piece. Though it’s easy to understand these terms when used in proper context, it’s important to keep in mind that not all jargon must be taken in a literal sense, as some may differ from their actual meanings. You may also see Professional Email Writing Examples.

Jargon in literature and everyday speech is essential in efficient and effective communication. It’s a common shorthand among experts of a specific trade, making it easier to deliver a message with a shared definition. So if you ever find yourself using jargon, make sure they are used accurately in context. You may also see Class List Examples.

More Education

More Examples in

up-arrow