49+ Analysis Examples in Word

49+ Analysis Examples in Word


A basic thing that any business must have—analysis. In most cases the analysis is an official document that includes planners and schedules, detailing all the processes for a project in the plans or improvement of what exists. Anything that fits under this umbrella of investigation and reporting and tracking falls under analysis writing.

If you have a business, you will do anything and everything to make sure it survives and prospers. The most successful businessmen tend to be hyper-vigilant to details, and so naturally you need this document—or the process, rather—of analysis in your business. But it’s easy to get sucked into the black hole of data. Remember that there are limitations to analysis. So gather only the appropriate data to analyze and inform your next actions. These examples will show you how it’s done.

Statement Analysis

Financial Statement

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Size: 108 KB

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Validity Analysis

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Size: 28 KB

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Statement Cash Flow

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  • DOC

Size: 34 KB

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Risk Analysis

Risk Management Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 11 KB

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Business Analysis

Business Impact

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  • DOC

Size: 12 KB

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Business Performance

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  • DOC

Size: 49 KB

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Business Case

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  • DOC

Size: 40 KB

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Investment Analysis

Portfolio Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 5 KB

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Capital Investment

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  • DOC

Size: 18 KB

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Income Property Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 4 KB

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What Is an Analysis?

An analysis as an official document, report, or research paper puts into writing the process of analysis.

Analysis as a process is when you take something large, multifaceted, and complex, and break it down into its components. You study or measure each component in order to determine several things. Depending on what you need to do the analysis for, you are either looking for insights into whether something is feasible (such as in a feasibility analysis), or in a business setting you are trying to understand a situation of possible riskcost benefits, investments, sales, processes, etc.

In academic circles, literary analyses try to understand the parts of a work of literature, as you might have seen in countless analysis examples in PDF on the net.

All this goes toward understanding the whole system better. In business as in life, such understanding and insight is power.

How to Write an Analysis

Before you set out to write an analysis, have a clear idea of your end goal or motive for needing to analyze anything in the first place. Your purpose will inform what kind of analysis you should perform—as well as point you in the right direction of whether you require examples of, say, needs analyses.

This is the first and most important step. Next: gather data.

After you have purpose locked down, it’s a simple matter of looking for the appropriate examples of such completed analyses. How you go about collecting the data is largely determined by the systems you already have in place. Glancing through a few examples of the appropriate analysis report should hone your instinct for what kind of data to collect, and what is just a waste of time.

After you have collected your information, run them through whatever data-processing systems you have in place, even if it’s just you with a spreadsheet and calculator.

Your quantifiable findings should then be compiled and presented into official reports as those shown in these examples. In this step, you will need tools that take your data input and churn out graphs and charts for visual representations. Text is good, too, but not as easy to register at a glance than a multicolored pie chart or line graph.

Ratio Analysis

Financial Ratio

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  • DOC

Size: 13 KB

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Sales Ratio

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  • DOC

Size: 11 KB

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Market Analysis

Web Market

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  • DOC

Size: 6 KB

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Real Estate Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 11 KB

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Stock Market

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  • DOC

Size: 7 KB

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Job Analysis

Job Safety Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 9 KB

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Job Hazard

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  • DOC

Size: 5 KB

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Demand Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 4 KB

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Research Analysis

Market Research

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  • DOC

Size: 4 KB

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Business Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 7 KB

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Data Research

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  • DOC

Size: 8 KB

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Project Analysis

Post Project

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  • DOC

Size: 16 KB

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Business Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 9 KB

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Project Stakeholder

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  • DOC

Size: 93 KB

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The Limitations of Analysis

Analysis and good business seems to go hand in hand. If you are planning to make it in the long run, you need to gather information about where you are and where you want to go, research about the advantages and disadvantages, collect information from the users or the people who will take over the services you offered.

Still, it is possible to go too far in the opposite direction. It is impossible to run a profitable business without analysis, but it is also possible to rely too much on analysis than is warranted.

Here are three major limitations of analysis that you must keep in mind in order to benefit from the practice without over-relying on it more than is due:

  • Most analyses provide numbers, not causes. Analysis works best on quantifiable data. When you need to know the specific causes of the outcomes you have quantified, your analysis reports may come up short on explanations. Insights must then come from other sources.
  • The accuracy depends on the clarity of your judgment. If one of these sources is just your ability to connect the dots, the final accuracy of your analysis report relies heavily on whether you are right.
  • They can’t be used to forecast future trends. For the most part, analysis is done on present and historical data to discover what is going on or what has happened, not what will happen. Even the most detailed analysis can at best give you a good guess to where things are headed, if circumstances stay equal. In a while, what transpires can only be analyzed in hindsight. Even in risk analysis, you are still only trying to guess at the future based on past events. Does this mean risk analysis is useless? Hardly. When the world is unpredictable enough, not preparing for what you can prevent is a foolish road to take. Risk analysis can help you prepare for what-if scenarios.

Regression Analysis

Logistic Regression

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  • DOC

Size: 19 KB

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Linear Regression Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 17 KB

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Multivariate Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 6 KB

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Requirement Analysis

Software Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 400 KB

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Business Requirement

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  • DOC

Size: 980 KB

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User Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 31 KB

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Gap Analysis

Skills Gap Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 10 KB

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Business Gap

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  • DOC

Size: 4 KB

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Customer Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 13 KB

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Stakeholder Analysis

Project Stakeholder

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Size: 6 KB

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Organizational Stakeholder Analysis

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Size: 13 KB

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Stakeholder Management Plan

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  • DOC

Size: 77 KB

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Why Is Analysis Important?

It takes a certain kind of audacity and courage to start a business. You must have an unrelenting trust in your gut instincts and intuition. At the same time, while this mind-set will help you get to market, it’s not always the best way to keep you there.

It’s easier than we think for people to get good business ideas. The genius is in the simplicity, often causing people to think of a successful new venture, I could have done that!

And yet it’s not so simple. This is why to get funding and venture your valuation, you need to conduct a financial analysis. Before that even comes to fruition, your business idea in the incubation stage often goes through a SWOT analysis to make sure there is place in your chosen market for your idea.

In all this and myriad other challenges in getting off the ground and staying afloat, analysis in various aspects of the business is a necessary task.

Company Analysis

Company Financial

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  • DOC

Size: 31 KB

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Construction Company

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  • DOC

Size: 31 KB

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Task Analysis

Job Task Analysis

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Size: 14 KB

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Task & Service

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Size: 53 KB

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Task Hazard Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 74 KB

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Activity Analysis

Literary Activity

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  • DOC

Size: 11 KB

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Criminal Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 62 KB

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Basketball Activity

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  • DOC

Size: 3 KB

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Safety Analysis

Safety Gap Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 14 KB

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Root Cause

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  • DOC

Size: 50 KB

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Organizational Analysis

Organizational Network Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 10 KB

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Organizational Impact

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  • DOC

Size: 6 KB

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Organizational Strategic Analysis Project

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  • DOC

Size: 13 KB

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Qualitative Analysis

Qualitative Data Analysis

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  • DOC

Size: 4 KB

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Guidelines for Analysis

The best guideline you can have is actually some simple analysis examples of different kinds of analyses. These can tell you more about what you need to know than any single bullet list of dos and don’ts—and more accurate to boot. This is especially true since no one analysis is helpfully identical to another. Circumstances can render otherwise similar data into very different situations. This will merit very different kinds of analyses. Will you need a risk analysis or a SWOT analysis?

This is where your judgment comes in.

The 4 main principles to guide you in your task can be summed up as follows:

  • Collect the data. Make sure it is complete, accurate, and relevant.
  • Process the data.
  • Present the results of your investigation in clear, comprehensive, and representative forms.
  • And most importantly, draw logical conclusions as to what must be done based on the insights garnered from these results.

These guidelines underlie every kind of analysis; no matter the end form, the function is the same. As long as you get this, and have a host of analysis examples to refer to, you should have no problem.