28 Analysis Examples in Excel

28 Analysis Examples in Excel


To make us more understand about something, especially those things that are most complex and difficult, we usually tend to break it down or separate and divide the pieces of information. That is actually the smart thing to do in that situation. Data analyst and researchers called that as an analysis.

Analysis, as defined by data analyst and researcher, is a process of breaking down a subject to make it easy to understand. Analysis has been helping prominent people to organise their findings and to create an effective result. An need analysis helps those people to stay focused and concentrate more on the data.

Financial Analysis

Financial Statement

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  • XLS

Size: 12 KB

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Impact Analysis

Activity Impact

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  • XLS

Size: 6 KB

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Payroll Analysis

Payroll Needs

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  • XLS

Size: 6 KB

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What Is an Analysis?

An Free analysis is a precise examination and evaluation of complex topic or data by breaking it into smaller substance or components part in order to gain a better understanding of it and uncover their interrelationships. An analysis is commonly applicable to Mathematics, Science, and Logic.

When applied to a composition or literary work (such as a poem, short story, or essay writing), an analysis is used as an expository form of writing where the writer divides a subject into its elements or part. This technique also involves careful examination and evaluation of details in the composition.

The Importance of Analysis

An analysis is important for both data gathering and composition writing.

When an analysis is used in composition writing, it means that critical thinking and process analysis is used to express a strong feeling to communicate a strong message. However, in data gathering, analysis is very crucial. The importance of analysis in data gathering are as follows:

  • Structuring the findings from data gathering and survey research.
  • Breaking a complex data into smaller elements to understand it clearly.
  • Obtaining important insights from the data gathering.
  • Creating significant decisions from the results
  • Preventing and avoiding human error through a proper analytical procedure.

Investment Analysis

Real Estate Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 32 KB

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Profitability Analysis

Customer Profitability

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  • XLS

Size: 7 KB

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Stock Analysis

Stock Technical Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 5 KB

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Process Analysis

Process Capability

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  • XLS

Size: 308 KB

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Cost Analysis

Cost Benefit

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File Format
  • XLS

Size: 50 KB

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Insurance Analysis

Insurance Needs

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File Format
  • XLS

Size: 5 KB

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Applicant Analysis

Applicant Flow

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  • XLS

Size: 45 KB

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Different Types of Analysis

There are six different analysis used by every scientist and researcher when researching and doing a data analysis. This different analysis is ranked from least to the most complex, in terms of knowledge, cost, time, and in performing a summary.

  • Descriptive Analysis – Is a quantitative analysis describing the main features a data collected and is commonly applied to a large volume of data such as census data. There are two types of statistical descriptive analysis — univariate and bivariate. The univariate analysis only involves one variable and it doesn’t deal with cause or relationships, while a bivariate analysis involves two different variables whose values can change.
  • Exploratory Analysis – Is an approach to analyzing data sets to find and summarize their previously unknown characteristics. This analysis is good for finding new connections and defining future investigations and questions but not a final answer to a current question.
  • Inferential Analysis – The goal of this analysis is to examine theories about the nature of data based on a subject taken from a data. This used to analyze an important data coming from a small sample of data. The inferential analysis involves estimating quantity.
  • Predictive Analysis – This analysis is a method that analyzes current and historical facts to make predictions about future events. This analysis predicts but it does not mean that it is accurate. Accurate predictions may happen if and only if it has measured the right variables.
  • Causal Analysis – This analysis is used to find out what will happen to one variable when you change the other. The implementation of this requires randomised studies.
  • Mechanistic Analysis – This analysis requires the most amount of effort. Mechanistic analysis understands the definite change in variables that lead to change the other variable for individual data.

To know more about the different types of analysis, you check out our analysis examples in Word and our analysis in PDF.

Gap Analysis

Position Gap

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  • XLS

Size: 10 KB

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Competitive Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 2 KB

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Test Item in XLS

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  • XLS

Size: 30 KB

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Ratio Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 3 KB

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Component Example

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  • XLS

Size: 6 KB

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Business Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 41 KB

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Replacement Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 3 KB

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Other Types of Analysis

  • Impact Analysis – An impact analysis is a well-organized process to assess and evaluate the potential effects and results of a disaster, accident or emergency that may influence a project
  • SWOT Analysis – This analysis is used to identify the organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats.
  • Critical Analysis – This analysis is commonly used in literary writing to it break down into elements for a better understanding.
  • Cost Benefit Analysis – A systematic approach to estimating the strengths and weaknesses of project investments or business analysis requirements.
  • Risk analysisRisk analysis is used to determine and define the risk caused by a natural and/or human error to individuals and businesses.
  • Business Analysis – A process of identifying business needs and managing solutions to business problems.

The Purpose of Analysis

Conducting an analysis to a bigger problem (even on small ones) are proven to create effective and easily understandable results. That is why an analysis is widely used method and technique for finding and extracting crucial information from a data gathered. The analysis never fails to serve its purpose.

  • Provides the best knowledge and performance.
  • Determines what should be the next thing to do.
  • The person conducting an analysis can also express or state his/her opinion about the problem or task
  • Identifies why things happen and why they don’t.
  • Provides an accurate and effective solution to a problem or task.

Variance Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 7 KB

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Conjoint Analysis in Excel

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  • XLS

Size: 3 KB

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Sensitivity Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 11 KB

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Inventory Sample

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  • XLS

Size: 3 KB

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Data Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 6 KB

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Cash Flow in XLS

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  • XLS

Size: 50 KB

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State Point Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 38 KB

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SWOT Analysis In XLS

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  • XLS

Size: 4 KB

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Expense Analysis

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  • XLS

Size: 23 KB

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Root Cause Example

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  • XLS

Size: 7 KB

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Tips for Doing an Analysis

It is important to conduct an effective analysis to make the result clear and understandable. That is why we provide essential tips for you in conducting an analysis.

  • Before you make an analysis, you must create a clear, concise, and specific hypothesis first. The purpose of this is for you test the theory easier and to create a simple analysis.
  • Use technology or syntax to review your analysis repetitively. This will decrease the chance of analysis error and save you time from running analysis over-and-over manually.
  • A little progress is still a progress. No matter how big or small the result is, it is still a result. You don’t have to force your analysis to come up with an impressive result, just let your analysis do its job.
  • Plan your analysis. Identify and determine what type of analysis should be suited for your project.
  • Create a hypothesis. But never base it on your thought, expectation or idea, base it on the theory you created.
  • Trim your data short prior to analysis. This is for you to focus more on the formal analysis itself rather than with some irrelevant and necessary data.
  • Be sure to check first the descriptive analysis. This is to examine the complex analysis on basic perspective.