Deductive Reasoning – Examples, PDF


Humans are social animals that like to distinguish patterns and create conclusions through the application of logic. One of the most used logical thought processes is called deductive reasoning.

1. Deductive Reasoning Template

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2. Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

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3. Deductive Reasoning Example

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4. Problem Solving Deductive Reasoning

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5. Inductive Versus Deductive Reasoning

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6. Deductive Reasoning & Decision Making

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7. Activity in Deductive Reasoning

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8. Multi-Step Deductive Reasoning Over Natural Language

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9. Deductive Reasoning Lecture

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10. Simulating Non-Deductive Reasoning

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11. Deductive Reasoning Fact Sheet

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What Is Deductive Reasoning?

Deductive reasoning is a logical approach to reasoning wherein the person will actively connect two or more premises to create a logical conclusion. The act of using deductive reasoning is called deduction, which is a soft skill that takes a lot of practice.

How to Use Deductive Reasoning For Quantitative Research

Deductive reasoning is the main type of logical reasoning that fuels quantitative research efforts. Proper usage of deductive reasoning will ensure that the data will be as accurate and precise as it can be.

Step 1: Choose a Quantitative Research Problem

Begin by choosing a quantitative research problem that you will try to provide data through quantitative research. This will determine your main method of quantitative data gathering.

Step 2: Select the Appropriate Research Method

There are many quantitative research methods that you can use to provide you with all the data you need to create a conclusion. For example, if you need to obtain plenty of data from a lot of randomly selected participants, then you will need to use surveys and group interviews as your main research methods.

Step 3: Gather and Collect Data Using the Quantitative Research Method

Be sure to prepare the necessary things that your quantitative research method needs. This will include the sample criterion, the instruments, the contract, and the incentive.

Step 4: Analyze the Quantitative Data You Collected

After you have obtained and collected the necessary data you want, then you must analyze this data through statistical analysis. Be sure to properly indicate the analysis you use. You may also include various visual aids like bar graphs and pie charts.

Step 5: Create a Conclusion

When you have finished analyzing the data, you must write out a conclusion that will either support or refute your hypothesis. The conclusion should try to close off the whole topic and give out recommendations on the next steps that should be taken.

FAQs

How do you use the deductive approach in the scientific method?

The scientific method is a standardized scientific approach that allows researchers to undertake efforts into understanding a specific phenomenon or theory while eliminating fallacies and biases. People primarily collect data by doing fieldwork, surveys (with the proper survey questions), and other quantitative methods of data collection.

Deductive vs. inductive reasoning; what is the difference between deductive and inductive reasoning?

Researchers often use deductive reasoning to try and determine whether specific codes have a correlation or a cause-and-effect relationship. Inductive reasoning is the juxtaposition of deductive reasoning, wherein the researcher will conduct a down-up approach by drawing patterns and codes from a conclusion. Researchers often use this type of reasoning to collect qualitative data through case studies, interviews, and community integration.

How do you identify deductive reasoning from inductive reasoning?

When people conduct deductive reasoning, they will often use two or more premises to form a conclusion. This is all to establish a causal or correlative relationship between both the premises and the conclusion. The basic structure of deductive reasoning is A + B = C, wearing A being premise A, B being premise B, and C being the conclusion.

Deductive reasoning is one of the two logical processes that try to establish and outline a correlational or causal relationship between two or more variables. People using this type of reasoning believe that the truth of the premises establishes or solidifies the conclusory statement. Much modern-day research hinges on deductive reasoning as its main point of data collection or gathering.

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