Teaching Philosophy – Examples, PDF


Often we think that correlation in any shape or form of two or more variables is the causation of a specific phenomenon or action. This is an example of a logical fallacy called post hoc ergo proptor hoc.

1. Teaching Philosophy Template

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 41 KB

Download

2. Teaching Philosophy Sample

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 114 KB

Download

3. Writing Teaching Philosophy Statement

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 75 KB

Download

4. Examples of Teaching Philosophy Statements

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 121 KB

Download

5. Writing Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 94 KB

Download

6. Teaching Philosophy Statement

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 127 KB

Download

7. Developing Teaching Philosophy and Statement Guide

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 87 KB

Download

 8. Tips for Writing Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 80 KB

Download

9. Student Directions for Writing Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 78 KB

Download

10. Teaching Philosophy and Practice

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 108 KB

Download

11. Teaching Philosophy Workbook

Details

File Format

  • PDF

Size: 86 KB

Download

12. Instilling Personal Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 87 KB

Download

13. Teaching Philosophy Dossier Template

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 67 KB

Download

14. Remediating Teaching Philosophy Statement

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 83 KB

Download

15. Classroom Environment Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 100 KB

Download

16. Components of Teaching Philosophy Statement

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 81 KB

Download

17. Teaching Philosophy Framework

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 86 KB

Download

18. Personal Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 93 KB

Download

19. Teaching Philosophy and Teaching Experience

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 99 KB

Download

20. Teaching Philosophy Long

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 130 KB

Download

21. Composing a Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 75 KB

Download

22. Teaching Philosophy Statement Checklist

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 36 KB

Download

23. Summary of Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 109 KB

Download

24. Reflecting the Context of  Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 85 KB

Download

25. Beginning  Statement of Teaching Philosophy

Details
File Format
  • PDF

Size: 56 KB

Download

What Is a Fallacy

A fallacy is a logical error in one’s reasoning that may stem from various ideas, interpretations, logical missteps, and beliefs, which stems from an argumentative error. If you want to learn more about fallacies and have samples for reference you may read any of the articles listed above; good reads include Logical Fallacies Philosophical Logic, Writing Process Logical Fallacy, and Round-Trip Fallacy Template.

How to Prevent Yourself From Committing a Fallacy

People should do their best to avoid committing logical fallacies when it comes to communication. This is because valid arguments can easily communicate points without causing any logical issues in communication, and may reduce the chance of miscommunication.

1.) Research the Different Types of Biases and Fallacies

It’s hard to prevent yourself from committing a fallacy if you do not know about them in the first place. Begin by researching the different types of biases and fallacies that may occur during conversations and arguments Examples of different biases and fallacies include sunk cost fallacy, ad hominem, straw man fallacy, slippery slope fallacy, gambler’s fallacy, and circular reasoning.

2.) Learn About the Argument Structure

The argument structure is the basis of how a proper argument is to be formed. Learning about the said structure will help you dissect your arguments and learn from your mistakes. The argument structure is composed of a claim, support, and warrant.

3.) Ask for Feedback

Another way to learn and prevent yourself from committing logical fallacies is to ask for feedback from your friends and family. This will give you an objective view of the whole situation and will allow you to catch mistakes you otherwise wouldn’t be able to without their help.

4.) Practice Thinking Before Speaking

Practice makes perfect, and speaking is a skill one has to be able to cultivate to minimize logical fallacies and prevent miscommunication. If you have no one else to practice talking to, you can practice talking to yourself in front of the mirror.

FAQs

What is a false dichotomy?

When a small number of alternatives are mistakenly portrayed as being mutually exclusive to one another or as the only options available, in a circumstance when that isn’t the case, it is known as a false dichotomy (also known as a false dilemma). A false dichotomy, for instance, arises when someone claims we have to pick between alternatives A or B without revealing that option C is also an option. When people misunderstand or misinterpret events, false problems frequently enter into their internal deliberations. False dilemmas are commonly employed purposefully for rhetorical ends in a variety of ways, such as to simplify difficult situations by transforming them into false dichotomies or to frame problems in a way that forces people to choose a particular position.

What is a bandwagon, and why is it dangerous?

Groupthink is characterized by cognitive prejudice known as bandwagon bias. You are subjecting your thinking to bandwagon bias when you accept a viewpoint only because it is widespread. Bandwagon bias frequently develops because it spares you the time and effort needed to otherwise analyze logically and draw your conclusions. Adopting others’ views happens considerably more quickly and easily, especially if they are well-liked and frequently encountered. Our objectivity is at risk from groupthink. It keeps us from exercising independent judgment and making the greatest choices.

What is zero-sum thinking?

In situations where profits and losses are not directly balanced, especially when one party is directly benefited at the expense of others, individuals tend to have a zero-sum bias. For instance, the zero-sum bias might lead someone to believe that a resource is limited, requiring them to steal part of it from others to use it, even when the item is truly boundless. Understanding zero-sum bias is crucial because it has the power to affect people’s decisions and actions in a variety of contexts. As a result, you will discover more about the zero-sum bias in the essay that follows, as well as its causes and suggestions on how to lessen its impact.

Fallacies are faults in logic that are caused by our brains trying to create logical shortcuts to lessen the amount of energy exerted by our brains. These often form biases that may seem to have some logic rooted in them but are proven to be ultimately false. People should do their best to avoid as many fallacies in their thinking because it can let people make skewed decisions.

More Business