8+ Simple Allegory Examples – PDF

There are many challenges that come with being a writer. Though writing is a free form of expression, there are some things that aren’t mean to be written on print as they may cause controversy one way or another. This is why many authors use allegory to express their principles and ideas in ways that are far from literal. However, allegory is more than just a literary device, as it has also become a key instrument in many of the most popular literary pieces in history. You may also see poetry writing.

Allegory Essay Example

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Allegory Poem for Kids Example

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Short Allegory Poem Example

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Definition of Allegory

Allegory is a literary device in which abstract ideas and principles are depicted through the characters, figures, and events in a story, poem, film, or even in an illustration or painting. The word allegory is derived from an ancient Greek word which means “to speak so as to imply something other.” This is often used in literature to teach or explain an idea or principle that may reflect contemporary occurrences in the real world. Here, authors and speakers use allegory to draw a moral or spiritual truth, or political or historical situation for an audience to grasp.

Some experts also consider allegory to be a type of extended metaphor which develops a particular analogy to a greater extent as opposed to a simple comparison. The allegory then uses a certain “metaphor” throughout the entire plot for readers or viewers to notice. Allegory has been used widely throughout history in various forms of art due to how it conveys complex ideas and concepts in such a way that is comprehensible by the average person. You may also see short essay.

Difference between Allegory and Symbolism

An allegory uses symbolic figures, actions, imagery, or events, yet it is fairly from symbolism itself. Unlike allegory, symbolism does not depict a story. Instead, these symbols simply stand for another object to give it a particular meaning. For instance, lions often symbolize courage, steadfastness, and power, but these qualities are simply vested in the imagery of the lion, as one doesn’t necessarily possess those qualities in real life.

Allegories, on the other hand, are narratives that express principles in a way that is less complicated for people to understand. These stories reveal a hidden meaning that readers and listeners are required to decipher in order to take in its true essence. Many authors (and sometimes speakers) use allegory as a literary or rhetorical device to project their interpretations of the world at large. You may also see free essay.

For many readers, understanding this “message” can be quite challenging, as people tend to draw their own conclusions based on what they perceive the “message” to be. But this is what makes allegories an exciting art form. As a writer and a reader, this allows us to look at things from different angles, giving our minds the chance to open up to new things that are far from their literal meanings. You may also see essay writings.

Allegory in Everyday Life

Allegory is often found in literature, although lately, many politicians and political researchers have began using allegory to present topics in formal debates. For instance, former U.S. President George W. Bush used the phrase “Axis of Evil” in his State of the Union Address to describe foreign governments that, during his administration, sponsored multiple acts of terrorism and danger to the world. He was also allegorical when he began using the term “Allies” for countries that would stand with the U.S. in waging war against the “Axis.”

Why Do Writers Use Allegory?

The great thing about allegory is that it helps an author express one’s views on a particular situation by teaching lessons and explaining moral concepts in such a way that is imaginative and thought-provoking. But since allegory is a very specific type of story, as a writer, the ultimate challenge is to stay committed to this message for the entirety of the story. Think of it as a road that leads to a certain place. If you decide to take a turn while driving, you may end up far from where you’re supposed to be. You may also see analytical essay.

Allegories also help writers make their stories multidimensional. This is done so that they may stand for something much larger in meaning compared to what they are literally perceived as. Let’s not forget that writing is more than just a hobby or a form of entertainment, as writing also serves as a means for one to communicate their views about the world through a creative piece filled with symbolic figures. A careful look at allegorical writing gives a glimpse of what goes on inside a writer’s mind, how they view the world, and how they wish the world was like. You may also see self introduction essay.

Simple Allegory Example

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Simple Allegory Example in Poetry

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Allegory in a Personal Poem Example

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Allegory in a Short Poem Example

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Allegory in Literature Example

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Allegory of Clark Kent Example

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Examples of Allegory in Film and Literature

There are many stories told in film and literature that are examples of allegory. Even if we hadn’t noticed it at first, many writers and filmmakers continue to use allegory to express their thoughts about situations that have happened, continue to happen, or could happen in the real world. These are especially popular in children’s books, TV shows, and movies due to how allegory can help an audience comprehend compound ideas in a simpler manner.

Here are some stories and films that have raised awareness on particular topics through the use of allegory:

1. Allegory of the Cave

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is one of history’s most famous examples of allegory. In this story, a group of people are chained inside a cave in which they could only see shadows of the outside world being projected on the walls. These shadows depict the reality that they’ve known from the very start. These people also refuse to escape from their chains because this is the life that they’ve grown accustomed to. But if a person was to escape from his binds to see what’s on the other side, and if he comes back to tell everyone what he’s seen, the rest of the people would only reject his interpretations of reality.

In this story, the escapee symbolizes the life of a philosopher. It portrays how difficult it is for a philosopher to explain his vision to others, in his attempt to widen their views of the world. That’s because the world that we know has been tainted by our own senses. Philosophers try to explain their theories, yet many skeptics (like the ones chained to the cave walls) criticize their works because they fail to open their minds to the endless possibilities of the unknown. You may also see descriptive essay.

2. The Wizard of Oz

Growing up, we might have recognized The Wizard of Oz as a simple children’s story that conveys the value of friendship and bravery. As a child, we only understood what could be explained to us in simple terms. For instance, the lion stands for cowardice, the scarecrow represents the agrarian past, while the tin man symbolizes the technological future.

But taking a deeper look at the story, some people suggest that it was also a satirical allegory of money and politics. One example would be how the author took a strong interest in golden matters. Since gold is often associated as an instrument with financial and personal freedom, it is painted as a villain in the world of Oz. It was a tool of oppression which also happened to be a huge political issue during the time of the tale’s publication. While the author does claim that the story is nothing more than a kid’s tale, some analysts can’t help but to point out the political references that were made through the story’s plot. You may also see persuasive essay.

3. Wall-E

Pixar has always been known for it’s one-of-a-kind animations that convey meaningful lessons for audiences to learn from.

So to anyone who’s seen Wall-E, the “Save-the-Earth” allegory might have been pretty obvious through the entire course of the movie. Though flying cars, jet packs, and holographic devices have often been depicted in many futuristic films, not many filmmakers seem to focus on what the world (and by world we mean Mother Nature) would be like if we continue to neglect its call for help. The fat couch potatoes that we laughed at in the film are a reflection of what the human population could turn into in the coming years. You may also see personal essay.

Even with the advancement of today’s technology, the concept of a space ark to save us from environmental contamination is highly unlikely. But the world transforming into a junkyard of scraps and plastics with the absence of flora and fauna to sustain life is bound to happen one day. And that’s not something we want now, do we?

4. The Chronicles of Narnia

There are many allegories in The Chronicles of Narnia, but the most notable one has to be the religious allegory portrayed in the The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. 

The story begins with a prophecy of four siblings who shall lead Narnia to victory against the evil hands of the White Witch. Narnians continue to believe that Aslan will come along to save them, but with no sight of him, there’s not much that can prove his existence except for one small thing: faith. You may also see high school essay.

As the story goes on, readers of the book and viewers of the film come into terms with the fact that Aslan is actually Christ. This is clearly portrayed when he sacrifices himself to save his people, is tortured and ridiculed by traitors of his land, and is resurrected during the time that people needed him the most. Even when Edmund (who symbolizes Judas) chooses to betray Aslan and his siblings, Aslan still forgives the young boy for his ignorance.

5. The Lord of the Rings

There are clear symbols of good and evil in the book The Lord of the Rings, although the author strongly denies his intentions to make it appear that way. Say for example, Frodo only intended to do good by destroying the ring, but due to the forces of evil, he and Sam engaged in unnecessary banters and arguments that have nearly gotten them killed in the process. Anyone who came in contact with the ring were overcome by greed and power, which is why Frodo refused to let anyone get their hands on it. You may also see academic essay.

The scenes from each book clearly depict the events that happened during the 1st and 2nd World War. It shows what evil can do to a person and how it can affect the rest of the world, with the merciless killings of the innocent, the armies of followers that believe in a dictator’s vision, and the deaths of millions—all to gain the one thing that could potentially destroy us all: everlasting power. You may also see evaluation essay.

Now that we’ve discussed the basics of allegory, why not make your own allegorical piece? Who knows, you might just be the next best author of this century!

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