10+ Printable Employee Action Plan Examples – PDF

There are simply times where employees lose their focus, and eventually their productivity in the workplace. Employee issues are caused by numerous factors. To remedy this problem, an employee action plan is used to combat non-performing and ineffective employees.

If you are tasked to create an employee action plan, here are some examples (in PDF format) to help you create your own simple action plan. We also included some tips in how to write an effective employee action plan.

Employee Action Plan Example

employee action plan example

Outline for Employee Action Plan Example

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Form for Employee Action Plan Example

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Employee Performance Review Action Plan Example

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5 Steps to Creating an Effective Employee Action Plan

Here are five crucial steps in creating an effective employee action plan for your own business organization.

1. Consider business goals

Before you even start to set objectives for your employees, you should align their development needs with your company’s business needs. When doing this, consider both your long-term and short-term goals. Ask goal-specific questions so that you can be clearly guided in how you create goals that match the need of your employees.

You can ask these questions: “Do you plan on promoting one of your people to a managerial position?” “Do your people need new software for them to improve their productivity?” etc.

Once you’ve carefully identified your objectives, you can easily identify the necessary skills and knowledge that support those goals.

2. Talk to your employees

Never assume that you already have full information of your employees’ skill sets and career goals. It should always be your first option to sit down with your employees and get to know them better. This may seem too personal but identifying their goals and skills beforehand can be beneficial for you and the employee.

Once you’ve identified his or her competencies, you can easily create a plan so that he can improve his productivity and effectiveness in the workplace.

3. Recognize potential vs. readiness

When you will be in the process of assessing your staff, make sure to determine the difference between “potential” and “readiness.” Remember that potential is only a prediction of what an individual can achieve while readiness pertains to the individual being ready to take the next leap in his role in the workplace. You may also see work action plan examples.

Here is an example of potential and readiness. Employee A may have potential to become the next sales manager in the organization, but there are issues in his communication skills especially when dealing with his coworkers and subordinates. Therefore, his readiness is in question and the promotion may be given to another employee. You may also like career action plan examples.

4. Consider all types of training and development

Training and development is important to the productivity and overall efficiency of your employees. But always remember that developmental programs don’t have to be expensive. You can always opt for classroom-style training or even online courses, depending on the availability of your resources. You may also check out sales action plan examples.

Other types of development include the following:

  • Assignments and special projects
  • Working directly with the manager or an industry expert
  • Local networking groups

5. Create a plan

Now it’s time to create the employee action plan. After you have identified specific learning opportunities, create a plan with specific and timely goals. Specify your professional goals and avoid writing general or vague ones to avoid confusion between you and the employees.

When creating your action plan, ask yourselves these questions: “What is it going to take to put your employees’ plan into action?” “Is there any prep work that needs to be done?” “Will employees need to undergo training?” “Will the employees benefit from the general action plan?” and “Will their productivity improve after undergoing the action plan?”

Editable Employee Action Plan Example

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Employee Action Improvement Plan Example

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Employee Action Improvement Plan Example

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Feedback Survey Action Plan Example

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Common Employee Problems

To better help you create solutions for your action plan, you first need to identify the root of the problems being encountered by your employees.

Listed below are some common employee problems that can help you create a more effective action plan:

1. Passive-Aggressive Behavior

Passive-aggressive behavior is very common in the workplace. The employee does not want to work on his task for a variety of reasons: he simply does not want to do it, he wants to do something else, or he is upset with his coworkers. This kind of behavior is usually the result of an unwillingness, or even an inability to confront the issue head on. You may also see marketing action plan examples.

Unfortunately, rather than being viewed for what it is, this behavior is usually taken as an indication that an employee either doesn’t have the motivation or is simply unable to do his job.

2. Hiding Behind E-Mails

Rather than confront an issue face-to-face, many employees today rather write an e-mail, even if they boss’s office is just a number of steps away. Unless you’re dealing with a complex issue (even complex issues need to be discussed first face-to-face), then sending an email is just a bad idea. You may also like business action plan examples.

Additionally, most people are not even good writers to begin with. They can be easily misunderstood in their formal emails, and unfortunately their superiors will already have an opinion before they even get to discuss the email in a personal setting. Despite technology, it is still easier to get your point across or discuss an issue in front of the concerned individual.

3. Over-Valuing Privacy

In legal terms, employers cannot really ask an employee about personal matters: being pregnant, getting divorced, problem children, aging parents, etc. This is to ensure that decisions are only based in the workplace and not matters outside the office. You may also check out sales action plan examples.

Employees are uncomfortable sharing their personal problems not only with their coworkers but also with their employers. But if an employee asks for a time off, vacation leave, or even higher pay, then employers would certainly ask for a valid reason. Employers almost always will be more sympathetic if they understand you have a problem that is beyond your control. You might be interested in SMART action plan examples.

4. Having to Always Be Right

Unfortunately, many professionals have a hard time admitting they are wrong even if they have already been proven wrong. Sometimes, this is mostly because they want to keep their jobs: they know that their employers will have the benefit of the doubt that they are still in the learning process (even though most of them have been in the company for a long time). You may also see research action plan examples.

But in any case, nothing is more annoying than a coworker who never admits his or her mistakes, and rather passes it on to someones else who may have also committed an error, but not as serious as the previous employee. The whole office will be in a standstill and nothing will be accomplished thanks to that one person. You may also like corrective action plan examples.

5. Emotional Competence

To gain the respect of all the people in the organization, including your supervisors, coworkers, and external clients, you need to be able to control your emotions. Showing excessive anger with an added emotional tone in your voice can produce negative results in how your peers view you not only as a professional but also as a person. You may also check out team action plan examples.

You may be a productive employee in the workplace, but showing too much emotion will certainly affect your relationships with coworkers as well as supervisors or managers.

Basic Performance Improvement Plan Example

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Basic Employee Correction Plan Example

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Bylaw Employee Action Plan Example

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We hope you found this article to be informative as you will be creating your own employee action plan.

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