How to Write a Funeral Biography [ 5+ Best Examples ]


People always wonder what’s so good about goodbyes. There really is no acceptable answer for that. Saying our emotional farewells and letting go of the people we love is always tough. Goodbyes could mean we never get to be with our loved ones ever again. It also means we never get a second chance to say things we couldn’t vocalize. Hating the idea of never seeing someone ever again rides along with the fear of forgetting those that matter to us. That’s why, as we send them off to their final resting place, we must remember them, how they lived, and keep them in our hearts forever.

A biography is a written record of the life story and details of a person, whether alive or deceased. In a biography, the writer is either a family member, friend, or anyone who knows the person very well. This is different from an autobiography where a person writes about his own life story and experiences. So with this definition, a funeral biography is a record of the life of someone who has passed away. This is read or presented during the person’s funeral as a way of remembering him before the final goodbyes are said. This is also kept as memorabilia long after the deceased has been laid to rest.

Who was he?

Funeral biographies can come in two forms: obituaries and eulogies. Although both detail a person’s life, their weight differs greatly. Obituaries are written newspaper reports about a person’s passing. This shortly discusses the life of a person, how they died, and the location of his memorial. They serve as an announcement to reach all those who knew the departed. They aren’t always as personal as eulogies, but they still get the job done. Eulogies, on the other hand, are more extended, more personal, and written by someone who was close to the one pushing daisies. This is tearfully read in front of the person’s family and friends during the memorial service. 

5+ Best Biography Examples

Shared below are steps on how to write a funeral biography. Tips that you need to remember in writing biographies are also included.

1. Basic Biography Outline Template

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2. Biography Report Template

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3. Biography Worksheet Template

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4. Free Basic Biography Outline Template

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5. Free Personal Biography Outline Template

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6. Free Sample Biography Outline Template

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7. Albert Einstein Biography

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Remembering You

Funeral biographies help readers and listeners remember the life of someone who has met the maker. This is a way for everyone, even for just a moment, to relive what it was like when the deceased was still around. This can be written in pamphlets or funeral service programs. But a string of recollected memories doth not a funeral biography makes. When writing a biography, you shouldn’t be too technical; you should bend your rules a little.

Written below are tips and tricks you can use when you need to write about a person who died.

1. Begin with the Basics

If you’re writing for an obituary, you shouldn’t forget about the basics. The birth date, residence, cause of death, and the deceased’s history are all vital parts in any obituary. These answer the questions the bereaved might feel too heavy to acknowledge. Since obituaries are usually written for newspapers, you should also include the location of the memorial service and burial date. This is to make sure all friends and family can come and commemorate the person’s life. God forbid they get haunted for not saying the final goodbyes.

2. A Little of You and Me

Writing eulogies requires a certain vulnerability, but you don’t have to be a professional content writer to makes something genuine. This is the part where you really recall the good times. You can detail what kind of person the deceased was, how he lived his life, and how much he mattered to people. This is where storytelling comes into play. By writing something heartfelt and relatable, you can make the whole church cry. You can use anecdotes, inside jokes, and even quote lines the guy famously said. It’s all about describing the person in a way that everyone can remember him by.

3. Light in the Darkness

As mentioned before, funerals and goodbyes are hard. They take an emotional toll on those who were close to the departed. Losing someone special always brings a negative feeling. So to combat that, you have to remember and recognize the good things. You could recall all the people whose lives were changed because of the deceased. You can write how he would finally be at peace. You can even mention all his awards, honors, and all his achievement certificates. This way, the coming of the angel of death would be easier to accept.

4. Art and Emotion

Funeral speeches can make anyone emotional. Why don’t you use these emotions to make something creative? Art created from the heart holds so much more than just physical value. Like how Walt Whitman wrote, “O Captain! My Captain” for Abe Lincoln, or how lead singer from FM Static wrote the song “Tonight” for his girlfriend, use your emotions to make something beautiful for your dearly beloved. This way, your creation would mean so much more than just an arrangement of words for the one who passed away. 

5. Words Only for You

Your funeral eulogy should also contain a special message for the departed. You can use cliched stuff like “you’re forever in our hearts” and whatever. Or you could be more in-depth. You can express how much the deceased impacted the people around him and how he changed the world in his little way. This part is where you can go all out. Pour your heart out on this one and let the departed know how you feel. You never know, there might be someone in the crowd who share your sentiments.

6. Picture Perfect Memories

A picture paints a thousand words. The encapsulated moments we never want to forget. That’s why you should include it in your biography and obituary cards. Seeing pictures of the lost one gives people a chance to see him in his happier days. They get to bring back the memories they shared with the departed. Everyone gets the opportunity to see his smile one last time before his burial. It could be a collection of photos from his childhood to his final moments, or photos of him with the people he loves most. 

Losing loved ones and coping with grief takes a lot of getting used to. But that doesn’t mean you also get used to not remembering them. That’s what writing obituaries are for; to remember our dearly departed. Besides, you don’t have to reread their biographies; you’ll always have them in your heart.

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