6+ Qualitative Research Proposal Examples in PDF


Writing a qualitative research proposal is just like writing any other research proposals. The only thing is that you are writing specifically designed to provide non-numerical data, concepts and the like. You are more likely to follow a specific format since it is a type of academic writing.

6+ Qualitative Research Proposal Examples

1. Qualitative Research Proposal Gantt Chart Template

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2. Sample Qualitative Research Proposal

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3. Proposal in Qualitative Research Template

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4. Individual Qualitative Research Proposal

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5. Qualitative Research Proposal Format

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6. Elements of Research Proposal Qualitative Design

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7. Qualitative Research Workshop Proposal

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What is a Qualitative Research Proposal?

A qualitative research proposal gives the detailed summary of your research study. It is a type of research proposal that only involves qualitative methods of gathering a certain data such as an interview, observation, questionnaire, or case studies. Qualitative research can be applied in the field of psychology, social sciences and the like.

How to Write a Qualitative Research Proposal?

Think of a Unique Topic for you to Provide a Good Research Title

Example: A Qualitative Study on Coping up with the Different Levels of Anxiety among Students

Develop Research Questions

Your research questions will be your guide in your research study. It contains the research design, research methodology and the technique you used in collecting data.

Example: What do the architecture and engineering students with anxiety do to cope up with their studies in the university?

For qualitative research, we can use the SPIDER method which stands for Sample, Phenomenon of Interest, Design, Evaluation and Research type.

Sample refers to your target population that is included in your study.

Example: The population consisted of a community of architecture and engineering students of the oldest university in the city of Manila, Philippines.

Phenomenon of Interest refers to an event or an object. What could be their experience in the university?

Design refers to the methods you used in conducting the study.

  •         Interview – refers to the one on one interaction with the participant.
  •       Observation – refers to observing the participants whether or not they are fully aware of the thought that you are observing them.
  •     Questionnaire – refers to the process of distributing survey questionnaires to gather answers from your participants. It ends with tallying the answers to see what the participants choose the most.
  •         Case study – refers to an intensive study about a specific person or group of people.

Ensure That Some Ethical Standards are Met

This refers to protecting the privacy or confidentiality of the data you have gathered and the rights of the participants.

Example: 

“There were more ethical considerations in almost all aspects for drug trials and clinical studies compared with proposals for epidemiological studies. Clinical research studies usually directly involve human subjects, either with preventive, therapeutic, or non-therapeutic procedures. In general, the study procedures in such study designs put human subjects at higher risks, thus there are more ethical concerns. The primary ethical considerations of clinical studies are competent medical treatment and care, alongside an acceptable risk–benefit balance. However, many laboratory research studies use stored specimens, with less invasive procedures, and epidemiology studies usually employ data collection through medical records, CRFs or questionnaires. Ethical issues for the latter, therefore, mainly concern confidentiality and privacy of the study participants. However, it was found that studies that collect new specimens received more comments on ethical issues. There remains debate among RECs about solutions for issues around sample export, storage, and reuse. However, it is recommended that in order to ensure adequate protection of human research subjects participating in scientific research, RECs bear the responsibility of guaranteeing that participants are provided with sufficient detail to be able to provide informed consent as well as to understand the reality of genetic research as it is practiced.”

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Consider Writing a Plan to be Used for the Whole Duration of Your Research. This Includes the Timeline and Budget.

Timeline – refers to the target length of time to complete your research.

Budget – refers to the estimation of how much your research would cost. All items that you think might be included in the budgeting must be included.

Don’t Forget to Include Your Reference

This contains the list of the sources that you should cite on the last page of your research. It usually follows the APA format.

FAQs

How long should a qualitative research proposal be?

Every research proposal should be at least 4 to 7 pages long or depending on the requirement of your professor.

Do we still have to write for the definition of terms in the research proposal?

Yes. You have the option to do so to introduce and define words that are difficult for the readers to understand.

What can be considered as a good topic in writing qualitative research?

Your topic will either be given by your professor or you may look into unique topics into the internet.

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