10+ Tutor Lesson Plan Examples [ University, Volunteer, School ]


Have you ever tried being a tutor to your classmates when you were in school? Have you tried volunteering as one to tutor other students from a different school or university? If you have, what was it like? What were the things that you did to arrange the lessons you were going to be teaching them? Did you have a lesson plan to match the activities you gave as a way to know what you were planning on teaching or doing first? If you said yes to some or to all of these questions, then you may be familiar or have done a tutor lesson plan before. For those who may not have tried writing a tutor lesson plan but have heard of it, no worries at all. Check out the article below for more information of what a tutor lesson plan is, how it works and how to write one.

10+ Tutor Lesson Plan Examples

1. Tutor Lesson Plan Template

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Size: 30 KB

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2. Volunteer Tutor Lesson Plan

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  • PDF

Size: 564 KB

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3. Standard Tutor Lesson Plan

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Size: 172 KB

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4. Student Tutor Lesson Plan

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Size: 40 KB

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5. Professional Tutor Lesson Plan

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Size: 59 KB

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6. School Tutor Lesson Plan

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Size: 98 KB

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7. Tutor Lesson Planning Sheet

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Size: 28 KB

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8. Tutor Lesson Plan in PDF

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Size: 2 MB

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9. Draft Tutor Lesson Plan

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Size: 57 KB

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10. Tutor Training Lesson Plan

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Size: 102 KB

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11. Printable Tutoring Lesson Plan

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Size: 510 KB

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What Is a Tutor Lesson Plan?

First of all, what is a tutor lesson plan? Is it the same as a teacher’s lesson plan or is there any difference to that? A tutor lesson plan is basically just like a teacher’s lesson plan. A tutor lesson plan consists of the planned activities usually made for a week, sometimes a month. Depending on the tutor and the style of writing. The lesson plan also consists of the tests, objectives, activities that a teacher or a tutor does before doing the lesson they are planning on teaching. In addition to that, it is a general to specific detail of the instructions, strategies, objectives, and goals of what the tutor is planning to do to achieve them. Listed in the lesson plan is also the learning process of their pupils as well as the teaching process. The step by step teaching process to show this was what they did when introducing the topic to class. Of course your lesson plan should also cater to the age range of your students. You simply could not give a university level lesson plan to a first grader or middle school class and vice versa.

The purpose of having a tutor lesson plan? Imagine having to do a class without anything planned out. There are cases where you make do with what you have, but you must also remember you are going to be doing this every single day. Rather than letting it turn out chaotic, having a tutor lesson plan lessens the problems that tutors face every day. The tutor lesson plan acts as a road map to showing you your outlined ideas all planned out. It also gives you a better view of how far you have gone through with the whole topic and idea and solutions. In addition to that, having a tutor lesson plan is better than not having one. You get to set your objectives and activities straight. It lessens the fear of having to do a lot of things without any guide.

How to Write a Tutor Lesson Plan?

Ever wondered what a tutor lesson plan looks like? What difference or similarities does it have to others or to even a teacher’s lesson plan. Check out the following tips below for more ideas or simply to learn more about them.

1. Write the Title of the Lesson

The first thing to do when you write your tutor lesson plan is to write the title of the lesson. The title of the lesson you are going to be handling should be written on top. Before you begin with your objectives. The reason for this is so you would not have a hard time searching for the lesson you are planning on teaching.

2. List the Objectives

List at least three and a maximum of five objectives for your lesson plan. Your objectives should be connected to each other but should not mean the same thing. In addition to that, your objectives should also touch the lesson and you are able to achieve them.

3. Write the Materials

A tutor lesson plan is not complete without having to write all the materials needed for the lesson. The materials could range from notes, books, research papers, etc. Write down the materials you are going to be using as well as the materials that you will use.

4. Add Your Time Frame

The time frame is an important part of the lesson plan. Give out an estimated time on how long you can do the lesson. Make your time frame realistic as well. The estimated time frame for every lesson is around 30 minutes to an hour at most. But of course, every lesson and lesson plan differs. Depending on how you do your class, your lesson time frame should not be less than 30 minutes.

5. List Your Activities

List your activities for each of the lessons you are planning on writing. Each lesson should have at least two or three activities below. The activities should also fit the level of your students as well as it should be connected to the lesson itself. Making the activity more relevant as it is connected to the lesson.

FAQs

What is a tutor lesson plan?

A tutor lesson plan is a series of activities and objectives that are planned and written down to do daily, weekly or yearly.

Why is it important to add a time frame?

The reason for having a time frame is to make sure that each lesson and each activity are given a priority. The fact that doing a time frame helps you by managing your time for the whole lesson for class.

Is it necessary to have activities for your lesson plan?

The activities are for the lesson itself. When you add activities in your lesson plan, you are merely writing what you are planning on doing.

Should my title of the lesson plan be specific?

The purpose of adding a title to your lesson plan is to write the name of the lesson you are planning on teaching.

Why is it important to match the level of your lesson plan to your students?

The reason for this is because, if you are tutoring a middle school student, you would have to match the lesson with their learning capacity.

Being a tutor is never easy. It is also not as easy as teaching students who may have a different level of learning capacity. To make this as easier as it can be, the tutor lesson plan is made to make it easier and less stressful. In addition to that, a tutor lesson plan is used to help manage time between lessons and activities for the whole class.

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